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Your Spring Secret to Feeling Lighter

Are you feeling a little heavier right now?

Depending on where you live, you may have hibernated during the winter months eating heavy foods to feel warm, resting more than usual, and getting less physical activity.

Now that spring is here, do you want to feel lighter and have more energy
for whatever fun is in store? Check out spring vegetables that are in season.

These vegetables have absorbed energy from the sun and nutrients from the soil which they will graciously share with you. They will help you lighten up!

Some of the many spring vegetables include asparagus, cabbage, collards, peas, snap beans, and spinach. Check your local farmers market or grocery store’s local selection for other vegetables available in your area.

Let’s take a closer look at one of the spring veggies, asparagus.

According to the Michigan Asparagus Advisory Board:
Asparagus is one of the most nutritionally well-balanced vegetables in existence. It leads nearly all produce items in the wide array of nutrients it supplies in significant amounts for a healthy diet.

Asparagus is the leading supplier among vegetables of folic acid. A 5.3 ounce serving provides 60% of the recommended daily allowance for folacin which is necessary for blood cell formation, growth, and prevention of liver disease. Folacin has been shown to play a significant role in the prevention of neural tube defects, such as spina bifida, that cause paralysis and death in 2,500 babies each year.

Asparagus is:
* Low in calories, only 20 per 5.3 oz. serving, less than 4 calories per spear
* Contains no fat or cholesterol
* Very low in sodium
* A good source of potassium
* A source of fiber (3 grams per 5.3 oz. serving)
* An excellent source of folacin
* A significant source of thiamin
* A significant source of vitamin B6
* One of the richest sources of rutin, a compound which strengthens capillary walls
* Contains glutathione (GSH) one of the most potent anticarcinogens and antioxidants found within the body

Its wealth of nutrients, fiber and very low sodium and calorie content make asparagus a nutritionally wise choice. Be sure tocheck their site for additional information and recipes.

So the next time you’re food shopping, pick up that handful of asparagus and try the easy recipe below! Don’t you feel lighter already?

Just so you know.
In case you’ve never eaten asparagus before, some people do experience unusual smelling urine shortly after eating. It is harmless and passes quickly and if you’re interested in learning more about this, google “asparagus urine”.

Would you like to know more about the 7 Keys? Click here to sign up for your f*ree special report, the “7 Keys Every Woman Needs to Unlock Her Healthier, Happier Life™”. And for even more support, you will receive the weekly Live Your Healthy Life newsletter with tips, helpful resources, and recipes.

Why You Don’t Want To Cut Out All Oils and Fats

 

Not all oils and fats are created equal!

Heavily processed, hydrogenated, “trans” fats and oils that are used in prepared, packaged foods can be extremely damaging to the body.
However, fats and oils from whole foods and other high-quality sources can steady your metabolism, keep hormone levels even, nourish your skin, hair and nails and provide lubrication to keep your body functioning fluidly.

Your body also needs fat for insulation and to protect and hold your organs in place. A healthy percentage of high-quality fat in a meal satisfies and leaves feelings of energy, fulfillment and warmth.

When there are excess fats and oils in the diet, especially heavily processed fats, symptoms can include weight gain, skin breakouts, high blood pressure, liver strain and an overall feeling of mental, physical and emotional heaviness.

Signs of insufficient high-quality fats are brittle hair and nails, dry skin, hunger after meals and feeling cold.

There are many sources of healthy fats and oils.

For sautéing and baking, try butter, ghee (clarified butter) or coconut oil because they do not break down when used at high temperatures.

When sautéing and stovetop cooking at moderate temperatures, try organic extra virgin olive oil.

Oils like flaxseed, sesame, toasted sesame, walnut and pumpkin seed are best used unheated in sauces or dressings on top of salads, veggies or grains.

Other healthy fats are found in whole nuts and seeds and in their butters like almond butter or tahini. Whole foods such as avocados, olives and coconuts are great sources of healthy fat, along with wild salmon and omega-3 and omega-6 organic eggs.

Experiment with these healthy fat sources and see which agree with you and leave you satisfied.

When selecting oils, buy the highest-quality organic products you can afford, since cooking oils are the backbone of so many dishes. Good words to look for on the label are organic, first-pressed, cold-pressed, extra-virgin and unrefined. Words to avoid are expeller-pressed, refined and solvent extracted.

Adapted from Institute of Integrative Nutrition

Would you like to know more about the 7 Keys? Click here to sign up to receive your f*ree special report, the “7 Keys EveryWoman Needs to Unlock Her Healthier, Happier Life™”. For more support, you will also receive the weekly Live Your HealthyLife newsletter with a 7 Key article and associated tips, helpful resources, and recipes.

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